THE SPATIAL IMPACT OF ETHNIC SETTLEMENT PATTERNS IN KOROGOCHO INFORMAL SETTLEMENT, NAIROBI

 

The City of Nairobi has experienced an imbalanced settlement pattern that stems from the colonial period when the City was divided into areas occupied by the Europeans, the Asian and the Africans.  The African community were further fragmented through divide and rule, so that Luos were predominantly in Kaloleni; Kikuyu dominated in Jericho.

With the attainment of independence, settlement in the City of Nairobi was dependent on ones income, with the urban elite being able to move to the areas previously settled by the Asians and the Europeans.

Nairobi has remained a largely segregated city based on income levels, with the majority of the poor households occupying the slums.  The slums are further segregated with the various communities occupying specific slums.  This thesis attempts to investigate the existence of ethnic enclaves, and the factors influencing ethnic settlement patterns in one of the slums in Nairobi - Korogocho, and the positive and negative effects of this settlement patterns especially among the Luos, Kikuyus and Boranas who live there.  The thesis recommends policy measures to reduce the negative implications.

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